Monthly Archives: March 2016

Ash Cave

Ash Cave

Ash Cave

Wordless Wednesday

Hocking Hills State Park, Ohio

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Identified

 

Thanks to a tip from Eliza Waters that this might be a sedge, I have found it to be so. Carex Communis, almost as memorable as its common name, Fibrous Root Sedge. It us found in eastern North America in sandy loamy soil and rock outcroppings. A perfect match. Thanks to all who dropped on to take a look at my nature trail curiosities.

Scrunched on the Nature preserve trail with my camera steadied on my pack to get a good shot, I made an amused sight. My memory recalls never seeing this wildflower before, i needed a good shot. Since… identification fails me.

Can anyone help me out? What is this wildflower growing on the floor of the Conkle’s Hollow State Nature Preserve, Hocking Hills State Park Ohio?

 

Half Light at the Falls

 

Day break half-light at Cedar Falls, Hocking Hills State Park, Ohio. Ohio’s most photographed falls, you have to get up before the masses.

Cedar Falls, Hocking Hills State Park

Cedar Falls, Hocking Hills State Park

Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge

Good Friday Cross

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The Rugged Cross Made the Difference

For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that you should follow His steps: “Who committed no sin, Nor was deceit found in His mouth” who, when He was reviled, did not revile in return; when He suffered, He did not threaten, but committed Himself to Him who judges righteously;  who Himself bore our sins in His own body on the tree, that we, having died to sins, might live for righteousness—by whose stripes you were healed.

1 Peter 2:21-24

Reaching…

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…over the edge toward the morning sun, grasping for spring.

Rim Trail, Conkle’s Hollow, Hocking Hills State Park.

Enjoyed some time away this week. No schedule, no TV, no internet, no cares, little phone service…just down time.

Resurgent

Sunday Scene

Resurgent

Resurgent (skunk cabbage leaf sprout)

 Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new.  Now all things are of God, who has reconciled us to Himself through Jesus Christ… 

2 Corinthians 5:17-18a

 

 

 

Skunk Cabbage – Springs First Flower (7 Photos)

Floral Friday

Its in a beauty category of its own. No flashy petals or rays make it stand out.  Its flower is more of an egg like spike. Beauty most likely is seen in the hood like bract that contains the flower – kind of pitcher plant like.

Flies and beetles appropriately pollinate the spike, what else wants to endure its smell. They seem to grow in pairs, deeply rooted in marshy ground, with signature Gnome-like hoods of maroon and green.

The leaves are starting to come on now, so you’ll need to get your chores boots on soon and take a muddy hike.

COB – Curious Placement

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Random 

Found this clothespin at the beginning of an often walked trail, I use for my test photo to set up for my hike. It always gets my curiosity going. How long has it been here? Did it mark a discovery trail once? Maybe it held clues to a treasure hunt. How many other hikers discover this out of place clothes pin and leave it unmolested? Guess I’ll never know.

Cee’s Oddball Photo Challenge

 

Springs First Wildflower

Skunk Cabbage Flower

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Skunk Cabbage Flower 

Skunk Cabbage reigns as springs first wildflower, although it usually can be found by the end of February. While some look to the harbinger of spring in the Red Winged Blackbird, I choose to search out the first Skunk Cabbage flower. It comes first – or brings hope earlier.

It grows in wetlands requiring dedicated effort to seek it out off the trail. It took me til this past weekend to seek it this year, but the satisfaction of muddy boots, dirty knees and fresh air for this capture ruled my  morning.

Skunk Cabbage is unique, forging its way into the world producing its own heat to melt late winter and early spring snows. The flower is undramatic, yet beautiful in its simple if rugged symmetry.  Its one big drawback…it stinks, like a skunk.

Given the conditions, I captured this shot at 55mm with a 20mm extension. I used the ISO auto setting at f6.3, aperture priority.

I’ll share some more of its captivating character later in the week.